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Posts tagged coffee

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Always reblog coffee-themed material.

I tried eating (or chewing) kola nuts when I was in West Africa. They were WAAAAY too bitter for me. I think you have to grow up with them to like them.

As for coffee, I just drink it because I like it. In all its forms. Drip brew, French press, espresso, Turkish, moka pot—any way you can give it to me.

Caffeine! (by scishow)

Filed under coffee caffeine Hank Green scishow video

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Drink Coffee? Off With Your Head!

Most folks who resolved to cut down on coffee this year are driven by the simple desire for self-improvement.

But for coffee drinkers in 17th-century Turkey, there was a much more concrete motivating force: a big guy with a sword.

Sultan Murad IV, a ruler of the Ottoman Empire, would not have been a fan of Starbucks. Under his rule, the consumption of coffee was a capital offense.

The sultan was so intent on eradicating coffee that he would disguise himself as a commoner and stalk the streets of Istanbul with a hundred-pound broadsword. Unfortunate coffee drinkers were decapitated as they sipped.

Murad IV’s successor was more lenient. The punishment for a first  offense was a light cudgeling. Caught with coffee a second time, the  perpetrator was sewn into a leather bag and tossed in the river.

But  people still drank coffee. Even with the sultan at the front door with a  sword and the executioner at the back door with a sewing kit, they  still wanted their daily cup of joe. And that’s the history of coffee in  a bean skin: Old habits die hard. —Adam Cole

Drink Coffee? Off With Your Head!

Most folks who resolved to cut down on coffee this year are driven by the simple desire for self-improvement.

But for coffee drinkers in 17th-century Turkey, there was a much more concrete motivating force: a big guy with a sword.

Sultan Murad IV, a ruler of the Ottoman Empire, would not have been a fan of Starbucks. Under his rule, the consumption of coffee was a capital offense.

The sultan was so intent on eradicating coffee that he would disguise himself as a commoner and stalk the streets of Istanbul with a hundred-pound broadsword. Unfortunate coffee drinkers were decapitated as they sipped.

Murad IV’s successor was more lenient. The punishment for a first offense was a light cudgeling. Caught with coffee a second time, the perpetrator was sewn into a leather bag and tossed in the river.

But people still drank coffee. Even with the sultan at the front door with a sword and the executioner at the back door with a sewing kit, they still wanted their daily cup of joe. And that’s the history of coffee in a bean skin: Old habits die hard. —Adam Cole

(Source: npr)

Filed under coffee history NPR